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2017 Audi R8 V10 Spyder The Best Convertible! https://youtu.be/b4ZdHPIj8H0 The R8’s conservative redesign hasn’t changed the reaction from the proletariat, but we wish Audi had pushed it a little bit further. The added geometric lighting units and angular grille openings front and rear have stiffened and sterilized its appearance, particularly in our test car’s hospital white with black convertible top, the only top color offered for this first year. The Spyder now features a contrasting side blade over each side air intake, like the R8 coupe, which helps liven up the looks, particularly when equipped with the $4800 Carbon Exterior package that also applies gleaming carbon fiber to the rear deck and the side blades. However enjoyable it is to cruise along reveling in public adoration and savoring the interior visuals, the R8 is happiest at speed. And it gets there quickly. They clocked its zero-to-60-mph sprint at 3.2 seconds, only 0.3 behind the comparison-test coupe, a car that was 70-hp stronger and 236 pounds lighter. The Spyder’s acceleration remained tremendous through the quarter-mile, its 11.4-second, 125-mph run being just 0.5 second and 4 mph behind the V10 Plus coupe. The open-air R8 accelerates, turns, and stops quickly, but none of that happens suddenly or unpredictably, in contrast to what we noticed in the V10 Plus during Lightning Lap. The standard cross-drilled wavy-edged brake rotors delivered a blockbuster performance, marked by steady, firm pedal action. As to the question of it feeling underpowered compared with the V10 Plus coupe, well, 3.2 seconds to 60 mph never feels slow. And if “going soft” means braking this well, steering this precisely, riding this beautifully, and sounding this good, the V10 Spyder need never apologize.
The Best of 2017 Tesla Model 3 | Highest Safety Rating In Every Category https://youtu.be/xkPcfjAiiD0 The Tesla Model 3 is one of the most anticipated new vehicles of the decade. While the Model S transformed how we see electric cars, the Model 3 is supposed to be the one that democratizes them. Tesla conceived the 3 to be simpler and more affordable, and the company hopes to build millions of them. At 184.8 inches long, 72.8 inches wide, and 56.8 inches high, with a 113.2-inch wheelbase, the Model 3 fits right in among an established entry-luxury cohort. Although its profile closely resembles that of the Model S, which is a fastback/hatchback, the Model 3 is a five-passenger sedan with a conventional trunk. It also eliminates the typical rear-window header and helps maximize headroom in back, while allowing the racier roofline and profile. It’s inside, however, where the Model 3 makes a far bigger splash. In what could be an ode to design minimalism, cost cutting, assembly simplification, or a mix thereof, Tesla has purged all gauges as well as some traditional switchgear from the Model 3. The Model 3, like the Model S, is a rear-wheel-drive car in its base form, with a rear-mounted AC induction motor. All-wheel-drive versions add a front motor as well as other upgrades including Ludicrous Mode performance. These are expected to become available sometime in the second half of 2018. Tesla has not yet specified the capacities in kilowatt-hours of the two available battery packs, and the Model 3 moves to a nomenclature that isn’t centered on the amount of energy storage. The Model 3 doesn’t use the same battery technology as the Model S. It uses cells with a new chemistry and format produced by supplier Panasonic.
2017 Bentley Bentayga | Bold Review https://youtu.be/KHncV22m6hA The Bentayga is Bentley’s Currently the fastest (187 mph) and most expensive SUV on the market. A twin-turbo 6.0-liter W-12 making 600 horsepower and 664 lb-ft of torque endows the roughly Audi Q7–sized Bentayga—no surprise given that it’s based on the Audi’s bones—with mega thrust. A dozen reciprocating cylinders under the hood is a magnificent start—from the velvety-smooth manner in which they alight, to the tastefully light snarl of the exhaust, and, of course, to never wanting for power. On the other end of the Bentayga’s performance spectrum, this latest version of the W-12 proved unexpectedly efficient, posting 23 mpg on our 75-mph highway test, substantially exceeding its EPA highway rating . Other details worthy of the admiration of the numerous onlookers vying for a glimpse include an exquisite jewelry holder that clips into the front cupholders, elegant analog gauges the artfully rendered interior door handles, and a metal gas cap so weighty that those unaccustomed may fumble it during the first removal. An exquisitely detailed, nearly three-ton luxury barge that accelerates almost like a Chevrolet Corvette Z06. Initial throttle response is laggy when attempting to drive gently, and then the power comes barreling on far too strongly. There’s a sag during the 1-2 upshift, and then it delivers another unruly surge. There’s switchgear borrowed from Audi, such as the cruise-control stalk and the steering-wheel knobs, but at least it is slathered in enough chrome to set it apart. Plus, there’s a selfie app built into the Android tablets of the rear-seat entertainment system, which seems spectacularly on point.
Picturing 2018 Maserati GranCabrio All-Quick Review https://youtu.be/ob3KR-fH7Tg While the untrained eye might not see much difference between the 2008 GranTurismo and the 2018 GranTurismo, there have been many small changes over the years. The 2018 model has new bumpers at both ends that help lower the drag coefficient to ensure that this Maserati (in coupe form) can reach at least 185 mph. Spec it right, Maserati hints, and you’ll hit the European magic number of 300 km/h, which is 186 mph. There are new headlights, an 8.4-inch touchscreen infotainment system shared with the Ghibli and some Chrysler products, the latest generation of Pirelli P Zero footwear, and a new analog clock. The sole engine is still the 454-hp 4.7-liter V-8, which traces its gestation to the belly of the 1999 Ferrari 360 Modena and has been screaming ever since. A six-speed automatic is the only gearbox available. It’s a bit underpowered for the class of 2018, which means it’s objectively behind more modern cars from Porsche, Jaguar, BMW, and Mercedes-Benz. Subjectively, the Maserati scores style points for its exterior design and the hand-built quality of its interior. Electronically adjustable dampers in the base Sport model offer a calm ride even when set to their firmest mode. The supposedly more aggressive MC version’s single-mode dampers are also compliant enough for daily duty. Start pushing around the GranTurismo and it can’t hide its long, 115.8-inch wheelbase and more than two tons of mass. In a sense, the GranTurismo reminds us of when Acura redid the new-in-1990 NSX for 2002. It didn’t gain any extra power over the 2001 model, only a cosmetic and chassis refresh. Like every Maserati ever built, it toys with your emotions and suppresses rationality.
World's Most Luxurious Sedan, 2018 Rolls-Royce Phantom Review https://youtu.be/Uu-0QApv2V8 The original Phantom was introduced in 1925, and Rolls claims that makes it the longest-lived model name in automotive history. In truth, there have been some lengthy gaps between a few of the generations, but this new eighth generation is directly replacing the current car, which was the first BMW-developed Rolls-Royce. The 140-inch wheelbase is slightly smaller than the previous car’s, and the overall length of 227.2 inches actually has shrunk by 2.8 inches for the standard-wheelbase version, although you wouldn’t accuse it of having less presence. The standard wheels will be 21 inches in diameter, while 22s will be a factory option. Details include headlamps with frosted-glass internal elements and laser main beams that are claimed to have a range of 650 yards. Although the new body shell is both lighter and, per Rolls-Royce, 30 percent stiffer than the previous car’s, the official curb weight of 5862 pounds actually is higher. Power comes from a new twin-turbocharged V-12 that has been derived from the 6.6-liter unit fitted to the more proletarian Wraith, Ghost, and Dawn and displaces, according to the scholars of history at Rolls-Royce, 6.75 liters. While the peak output of 563 horsepower is the same as its fractionally smaller siblings, torque output rises substantially—to 664 lb-ft, available from 1700 rpm. That means this Phantom is rated for 110 horsepower and 133 lb-ft more than its predecessor. Torque is directed exclusively to the rear axle via an eight-speed ZF automatic transmission that is connected electronically to a geolocation system to help it choose appropriate gears.
Don't Call This Mini! 2017 Mini Cooper Country Man Review https://youtu.be/mSYYKO3_SfQ Bigger and more versatile than any Mini before it, the all-new 2017 Mini Cooper Countryman is a stylish and comfortable subcompact crossover SUV. Although it may not look very different from its predecessor, the new Countryman rides on an entirely new chassis shared with the wagonlike Mini Cooper Clubman and the BMW X1. Last year’s base, 121-hp 1.6-liter inline-four has been replaced by a 134-hp turbocharged 1.5-liter inline-three. An all-wheel-drive system Mini calls ALL4—a feature previously not offered on the base model—is now optional. The Countryman is motivated by Mini’s now-ubiquitous turbocharged 1.5-liter three-cylinder engine. While the three-cylinder feels sufficiently powerful in other Mini models, the Cooper Countryman’s 3300-plus pounds quickly overwhelm the 134-hp engine. Both the front-drive Countryman and the all-wheel-drive Countryman ALL4 come standard with a six-speed manual transmission. The shifter’s well-defined gates, relatively short throws, and crisp action make rowing through the gears a pleasure. Nevertheless, the three-cylinder’s narrow powerband, which peaks by 5000 rpm (1600 rpm short of the tachometer’s redline), means Countryman drivers will be regularly swapping cogs to make the most of the crossover’s available power. Although the Countryman comes equipped with a tiny inline-three-cylinder, its EPA fuel-economy ratings are par for the class. The Countryman distinguished itself in our real-world fuel-economy testing, however. The engine struggles to provide adequate motivation, especially in passing situations, but it should be noted that our 50-to-70-mph acceleration test is done with the transmission in top gear. The Countryman is both quiet and refined, with steering that’s well weighted and communicative. Nevertheless, the Mini’s extra coin does net buyers a cabin that’s filled with high-quality materials and sufficient passenger space, and its chassis is more refined than anything else in the class.
Meet New Sport Styling 2017 Lexus lS Review https://youtu.be/Rqu_St8gt8A As part of a 2017 refresh, Lexus fiddled with the shapes of the headlights, the front bumper, and the taillights. The oval exhaust tips became rectangular, and the front outer air intakes are longer and deeper. The mid-grade IS300 F Sport, which shares its naturally aspirated 3.5-liter V-6 with the IS350. Here, however, it’s detuned to 255 horsepower and 236 lb-ft of torque and comes only with all-wheel drive. As in the IS350 AWD, the IS300’s big V-6 mates to a six-speed automatic with its turbocharged 2.0-liter inline-four making 241 horsepower and 258 lb-ft. The V-6 engine emits a pleasing snarl without any coarseness, and both the six- and eight-speed transmissions shift smoothly. By the spec sheet, the 306-hp IS350 looks plenty strong. But in reality, this port- and direct-injected V-6 pushes too many pounds. The IS300, meanwhile, barely exceeds the four-cylinder IS200t’s horsepower and trails behind in torque. The driver’s seating position is appropriately low and offers good visibility, although the back seat and trunk are tight—not surprising given the tidy overall package. The F Sport’s central tachometer is motorized and will slide right to reveal a secondary LCD screen for viewing various vehicle settings. The window motors slow their force upon initial opening and final closing to soften the deafening roar of glass against rubber seals. In a nutshell, an all-around satisfying luxury sports sedan mostly in need of extra speed.
2017 Dodge Caravan Auto Review https://youtu.be/7yXT9ToqLMY A suburban staple since its 1984-model-year introduction, the Dodge Caravan has outlived acid-wash jeans, guru of good times Spuds MacKenzie, and the relevancy of Andrew Dice Clay. But here we are in 2017, and factory-fresh Grand Caravans continue to arrive on dealer lots. Now in its fifth generation, Dodge shuffled the available trim levels for 2017, eliminating the R/T model and the American Value package, so the lineup now stacks up as SE, SE Plus, SXT, and GT, in ascending order. Our test example was a GT. While hardly a cutting-edge powertrain, it provides enough gumption to propel the Caravan from zero to the 60-mph mark in 7.8 seconds and through the quarter-mile in 16.1 with a trap speed of 88 mph; both times are just 0.2 second behind those posted by a 2017 Chrysler Pacifica. In the Grand Caravan, a governor steps in at 113 mph, and you likely wouldn’t want to go much faster anyhow, as the Caravan’s numb steering, susceptibility to crosswinds, and aging chassis require constant correction to keep it on the straight and narrow. The 20-mpg fuel economy observed over the course of the Caravan’s stay with us exactly matches the EPA combined rating, with the agency’s city figure at 17 mpg and the highway rating at 25 mpg. While its demise is inevitable, the Caravan has been granted a stay of execution of sorts. FCA is letting it coexist with the much vaunted Pacifica at least through the rest of the 2017 model year and likely into 2018 as well. So if raw utility and passenger-carrying capacity outweigh your need for parking-lot cachet and the latest styling and technology, the aged Caravan is still a contender for your cash #cars #car #ride #drive #driver #sportscar #vehicle #vehicles #street #road #freeway #highway #sportscars #exotic #exoticcar #exoticcars #speed #tire #tires #spoiler #muffler #race #racing #wheel #wheels #rim #rims #engine #horsepower
2018 Audi A5 First Debut https://youtu.be/e8dzvrq9egE The seasons always change, but convertibles rarely do. The idea of a retractable roof on automobiles has existed since before the invention of the car itself, and droptops have been a mainstay of Audi's offerings for decades now. The newly redesigned A5 cabriolet sets nary a tire wrong, being exactly as polished, swift, and refined as we're come to expect from modern Audis only with the extra joy of open-air driving to sweeten the deal. For starters, the droptop A5 is a performer. An extra 360 pounds compared with the coupe dulls the cabriolet's acceleration somewhat, increasing the zero-to-60-mph time from the coupe's 5.0 seconds to a less spry 5.6. But the A5 cabriolet still turned in a sports-car-like skidpad figure of 0.96 g and a short 145-foot stop from 70 mph, beating out its hardtop counterpart by 0.03 g and 7 feet. Audi's expert chassis tuning also means that the A5 is able to balance its performance with a genuinely relaxed character, appropriate for its mission as a luxury droptop that most owners will use as a fair-weather daily driver. Thus far, Audi has stuck with traditional soft-tops, presumably to save weight and to ease packaging versus the retractable hardtops some competitors favor. The A5 cabriolet抯 cloth top does a good job of insulating the cabin when raised, with only a small amount of wind noise noticeable on the highway. Lowering the top is a 15-second affair that can be done at speeds up to 31 mph. The A5 cabriolet's goodness also doesn't come cheap, with the convertible costing nearly $7000 more than the coupe. Prestige-trim-level test car was loaded with extras, pushing the total to $65,050. #cars #car #ride #drive #driver #sportscar #vehicle #vehicles #street #road #freeway #highway #sportscars #exotic #exoticcar #exoticcars #speed #tire #tires #spoiler #muffler #race #racing #wheel #wheels #rim #rims #engine #horsepower
MEET NEW 2018 McLaren 570S Spider! https://youtu.be/oe0FEGXdFks McLaren is going countercultural by prioritizing driver involvement, even at sub-racetrack speeds, something regularly sacrificed across the industry due to ever-increasing horsepower, performance, and weight. While even McLaren succumbs to the siren song of the stopwatch on more expensive wares such as the 720S, the focus on feedback on its lower-priced Sports Series line of cars. The pursuit of driving character makes McLaren continuing to use hydraulically assisted power steering, instead its electric-assist lumps like everyone else. The 570S Spider expected to be powered by McLaren’s familiar twin-turbocharged, flat-plane-crank V-8 that was designed with the English engineering firm, Ricardo, run to 8200 rpm, and makes 562 horsepower in order to dash to 60 mph in 3.0 seconds and to return quarter-mile times in the high-10-second range. The Spider feels coupelike in its solidity, despite receiving no additional bracing to its carbon-fiber structure. Even with the exhaust at its loudest, though, with the top down, wind noise takes over above 70 mph or so. To better hear the 3.8-liter V-8 at high speeds, either find a tunnel or keep the top up and lower only the independently controlled rear window. This is actually a pleasant cruising option, where some outside air still wafts into the cabin but without permitting irritating wind buffeting. Befitting a supercar, the 570S’s extroverted looks turn heads as well as anything. Even with the car out of sight, folks are drawn to the properly cantankerous, tack-spitting grumble of the 570’s twin-turbo V-8 when it’s first started. At $211,300 to start, the Spider’s price is roughly 10 percent higher than the coupe’s, but depending on paint, trim, and feature options, it’s basically a wash, with as-equipped prices for coupe, GT, and convertible widely overlapping. #cars #car #ride #drive #driver #sportscar #vehicle #vehicles #street #road #freeway #highway #sportscars #exotic #exoticcar #exoticcars #speed #tire #tires #spoiler #muffler #race #racing #wheel #wheels #rim #rims #engine #horsepower
Meet New 2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia 2.0T RWD! https://youtu.be/SZIiKtEzJf4 Alfa is embarking on a more difficult journey, fleshing out the full discography with more mainstream versions of the Giulia sedan that have a four-cylinder engine. What Alfa has gotten right, it’s gotten spectacularly right, starting with the Giulia’s looks. Although some might take issue with the unusually shaped front grille, this sedan has a perfectly proportioned body that exudes character on the road. The Giulia’s dynamics also are spot-on, achieving a nearly ideal ride or handling balance that picks up where the BMW 3-series left off one generation ago. It doesn’t take much seat time to feel the liveliness of the Alfa’s controls, starting with the perfectly weighted steering rack, which has great on-center feel, quick turn-in, and, above all, is communicative, with just the right amount of feedback filtered through to the driver. The Giulia’s turbocharged 2.0-liter inline-four is less of a standout. Although its 280 horsepower tops that of its closest German rivals, our zero-to-60-mph test result of 5.7 seconds trailed the 252-hp Audi A4 by 0.5 second and the 248-hp BMW 330i by 0.3. Alfa Romeo has some ground to cover to catch up to the class-leading interiors from Mercedes-Benz and Audi. The Giulia’s dashboard layout is pleasing to look at, with attractive gauges and an infotainment screen that’s nicely integrated into the dash. But there are some unsightly and cheap-feeling plastics surrounding the shifter and on the door panels. By now you’re probably wondering about the Giulia’s build quality, long a pain in the side of all Italian cars. Long-term durability remains a big question mark, and Alfa’s reputation doesn’t instill much confidence. Keywords: 2017 alfa romeo giulia, 2017 alfa romeo giulia 0 to 60, 2017 alfa romeo giulia 0-60, 2017 alfa romeo giulia 1/4 mile, 2017 alfa romeo giulia 1/4 mile time, 2017 alfa romeo giulia 2.0, 2017 alfa romeo giulia 2.0 review, #cars #car #ride #drive #driver #sportscar #vehicle #vehicles #street #road #freeway #highway #sportscars #exotic #exoticcar #exoticcars #speed #tire #tires #spoiler #muffler #race #racing #wheel #wheels
2017 Ford Focus, Inside and Outside https://youtu.be/12elSSmXmCQ Ford’s third-generation Focus, is now merely a competent small car that is starting to show its age among a set of fresher rivals. The current Focus sedan and hatchback have been around since the 2012 model year without major changes, leaving it behind many competitors in terms of available technology. The Focus offers a choice of two engines: a naturally aspirated 2.0-liter inline-four and a turbocharged 1.0-liter three-cylinder that’s designed for better fuel economy. The 1.0-liter is now offered only in the sedan, and it sacrifices some mph to earn EPA highway ratings of up to 40 mpg. Ford has simplified the Focus lineup, eliminating certain configurations, including our favorite, the hatchback with the 2.0-liter engine and a manual transmission. The Focus remains one of the more fun-to-drive cars in its segment, with quick steering and a responsive, well-balanced chassis. It’s refined, too, with a composed ride and a relatively isolated interior that make it feel more expensive than it is. We think the clean exterior styling has aged well against extroverted new competition such as the latest Honda Civic. The available Sync 3 touchscreen infotainment system is refreshingly easy to use, with well-organized menus and large onscreen buttons. Sync 3, which is standard on SEL and Titanium trim levels, also supports Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration. The Focus resides on the smaller end of its segment, and its interior feels cramped. The rear seat is tight for adults, and, even in the hatchback, cargo space is less than generous. Few active-safety features are available, and the ones that are—namely blind-spot monitoring and lane-departure warning—come only as part of a $795 option package on the top Titanium trim level, meaning you’ll pay more than $25,000 for a Focus so equipped. Keywords: 2017 ford focus, 2017 ford focus 0 to 60, 2017 ford focus 0-100, 2017 ford focus 0-60, 2017 ford focus 1.0 ecoboost, 2017 ford focus 1.0 ecoboost review, 2017 ford focus 1.5, 2017 ford focus 1.5 ecoboost, 2017 ford focus 1.5 ecoboost review, #cars #car #ride #drive #driver #spo
2018 Honda Accord, Most Suitable Car. https://youtu.be/XRgf6NFYQjQ Crossovers may dominate in sales, but an affordable, efficient four-door sedan with a chassis and powertrain that don’t retreat at the first sign of spirited driving remains a universal target in the car biz. Few models have hit the bull’s-eye as consistently and systematically as Honda’s Accord sedan. Rated at 192 horsepower and 192 lb-ft of torque, the 1.5 outmuscles the old 2.4 by 7 horsepower and 11 lb-ft and delivers both far lower in the rev range. Peak horsepower for the new engine is available at 5500 rpm and peak torque at 1500 rpm.The 1.5 comes paired either with a continuously variable automatic (CVT) or, in Sport trim, an optional six-speed manual. The 2.0-liter comes with either a 10-speed automatic or an optional six-speed manual in Sport models.Honda tells us the CVT is largely new and features an 11 percent shorter initial ratio for more aggressive step-off. While the 10-speed auto “shares its case” with the unit in the Odyssey minivan, Honda tells us that it largely has its own ratios. Compared with the six-speed automatic from the outgoing V-6 Accord, the 10-speeder is said to be 22 pounds lighter with a 68 percent wider overall range, a 43 percent lower first gear, and a 17 percent taller top gear. Finally, after years of trying to convince the world otherwise, Honda has relented and will equip every 2018 Accord with not only an analog volume knob but also a genuine knob for tuning. With the frustration of tuning the radio remedied, it’s worth mentioning the various audio systems. The new Accord hits showrooms this fall. Keywords: 2018 honda accord, 2018 honda accord 0-60, 2018 honda accord 10 speed, 2018 honda accord 2 door, 2018 honda accord 2.0, 2018 honda accord 2.0 turbo, 2018 honda accord 2.0 turbo specs, 2018 honda accord 2.0l, #cars #car #ride #drive #driver #sportscar #vehicle #vehicles #street #road #freeway #highway #sportscars #exotic #exoticcar #exoticcars #speed #tire #tires #spoiler #muffler #race #racing #wheel #wheels #rim #rims #engine #horsepower
What Changed? 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe AWD Quick Review Hyundai made some changes for the 2017 model year to keep things fresh. In addition to a more sophisticated look, Hyundai added a new top-level trim called Ultimate and upped its tech game. With the smaller, five-passenger Santa Fe Sport playing in the small-crossover field, the Santa Fe offers standard three-row seating and V-6 power. From a design standpoint, there’s a sharper-edged front bumper, restyled headlights and taillights, new vertical LED daytime running lights, and a wider grille, as well as tweaks to the wheels and the exhaust tips. The cumulative effect is a more assertive and less cartoonish look for this crossover. Powering the 4371-pound Santa Fe is a 3.3-liter V-6 engine that makes 290 horsepower and 252 lb-ft of torque. This direct-injected engine with variable valve timing is shared with the Kia Sorento, among other vehicles. It’s coupled with a six-speed automatic transmission. Towing is rated at a commendable 5000 pounds. In our testing, the Santa Fe did zero to 60 mph in 7.3 seconds and ran the quarter-mile in 15.8 seconds at 90 mph. Those results fall in line with our test results for the Dodge Durango and the Nissan Pathfinder. The GMC Acadia and the Honda Pilot, however, both beat the Santa Fe by more than a second, reaching 60 mph in 6.2 seconds. The Santa Fe has great tech and safety features, especially for the price, and is capable of handling just about everything you’d need day to day. Fuel economy and interior space push it back in the pack, however, and with so many competitors in the midst of introducing newer models, it’s starting to feel outclassed. Keywords: 2017 hyundai santa fe awd, 2017 hyundai santa fe awd review, 2017 hyundai santa fe awd se, 2017 hyundai santa fe awd sport, 2017 hyundai santa fe awd system, 2017 hyundai santa fe limited ultimate awd, 2017 hyundai santa fe sport 2.0t awd, 2017 hyundai santa fe, 2017 hyundai santa fe 0-60, 2017 hyundai santa fe 2.0t, 2017 hyundai santa fe 2.0t 0-60, 2017 hyundai santa fe 2.0t ultimate, 2017 hyundai santa fe 2.2 crdi, 2017 hyundai santa fe 2.4, 2017 hyundai santa fe 2.4l, #cars #car #ride #drive #driver
What's New in 2017 Toyota Corolla? Simple Review The Toyota Corolla has refreshed styling, a new special edition, and a batch of active safety features that are standard across the board. The front end is redesigned, and the interior has a revised instrument panel and climate controls. The Corolla 50th Anniversary Edition wears special Black Cherry Pearl paint; the exclusive color theme and badging extend into the cabin, too. Every Corolla has the Toyota Safety Sense system, which includes adaptive cruise control, automatic high-beams, lane-departure warning and lane-keeping assist, forward-collision warning, and automated emergency braking. An underpowered 132-hp 1.8-liter four-cylinder is the standard engine. The LE Eco uses a specially tuned version that makes 140 horsepower and slightly less torque. The Corolla will get people from point A to B, eventually. With the CVT, it crawled to 60 mph in 9.5 seconds; the Corolla SE with the six-speed manual managed to get to 60 a full second quicker. Buyers seeking a semblance of peppiness should look at any other competitor. EPA highway rating is meager versus more powerful compacts. The Toyota also underperformed in our real-world fuel-economy test. EPA estimates for the standard 1.8-liter four-cylinder are 28 mpg city and 35 mpg highway. That highway rating trails all comers, while the city figure beats only the much more powerful Mazda 3 by 1 mpg. The Corolla’s various cubbies are adequate for most interior-stowage needs. Larger items can be held in the front-door pockets, and there’s a handy bin at the front of the center console. Inside the console is a helpful shelf above a usable open space. The Corolla is a safety superstar, with an abundance of standard active-safety assists and top marks in crash tests. Those looking for the safest and cheapest car in this class can feel confident in making this choice. Keywords: 2017 toyota corolla, 2017 toyota corolla 0 to 60, 2017 toyota corolla 0-60, 2017 toyota corolla 1.3 esteem, 2017 toyota corolla 1.33 life, 2017 toyota corolla 1.6, 2017 toyota corolla 1.8, 2017 toyota corolla 2.0, 2017 toyota corolla 50 anniversary, 2017 toyota corolla 50th anniversar
Decent Ride 2017 Nissan Titan V-8 4x4 Single Cab at Glance It doesn’t take much to explain the appeal of the Range Rover Evoque. Just look at it. Its proportions and detailing make it arguably the most avant-garde member of Land Rover’s stylish Range Rover lineup. Range Rover has added several trim levels recently, meaning you can pay absurd amounts of money for this diminutive fashion statement—upward of $65,000 for loaded Autobiography models. With a sticker like that, the Evoque nearly prices itself beyond the realm of other small luxury SUVs such as the BMW X1 and the Mercedes-Benz GLA, both of which barely crest $50,000 when fully loaded. It is dimensionally similar, however, and is powered by a turbocharged 2.0-liter inline-four, like most of its closest rivals. The Evoque’s performance was distinctly average for its class, the turbo four combining with the nine-speed to get the portly 4059-pound crossover to 60 mph in 6.6 seconds. That lags behind the aforementioned BMW and Mercedes models but beats the Lexus NX and the Audi Q3. The Evoque achieved a disappointing 25 mpg in our 75-mph highway fuel-economy test, 4 mpg below its EPA highway rating. The lighter X1 and GLA hit 29 mpg and 34 mpg in the same test. Beyond that surface-level appeal, the Evoque falls short on functionality. That attractive touchscreen’s menus can be convoluted, a north-up map orientation can’t be locked in, and it lacks key features such as voice control for the navigation system. Also, the Evoque’s chopped-roof look unsurprisingly robs cargo space and rear-seat room. Like many luxury vehicles, this is a car you buy because of the way it makes you feel and the way others look at you when you’re driving it. The sacrifices that the Evoque requires, both monetarily and in terms of practicality, will be worth it for some—just as with most style statements. #cars #car #ride #drive #driver #sportscar #vehicle #vehicles #street #road #freeway #highway #sportscars #exotic #exoticcar #exoticcars #speed #tire #tires #spoiler #muffler #race #racing #wheel #wheels #rim #rims #engine #horsepower
Totally Sharp 2017 Range Rover Evoque in 2 Minutes It doesn’t take much to explain the appeal of the Range Rover Evoque. Just look at it. Its proportions and detailing make it arguably the most avant-garde member of Land Rover’s stylish Range Rover lineup. Range Rover has added several trim levels recently, meaning you can pay absurd amounts of money for this diminutive fashion statement—upward of $65,000 for loaded Autobiography models. With a sticker like that, the Evoque nearly prices itself beyond the realm of other small luxury SUVs such as the BMW X1 and the Mercedes-Benz GLA, both of which barely crest $50,000 when fully loaded. It is dimensionally similar, however, and is powered by a turbocharged 2.0-liter inline-four, like most of its closest rivals. The Evoque’s performance was distinctly average for its class, the turbo four combining with the nine-speed to get the portly 4059-pound crossover to 60 mph in 6.6 seconds. That lags behind the aforementioned BMW and Mercedes models but beats the Lexus NX and the Audi Q3. The Evoque achieved a disappointing 25 mpg in our 75-mph highway fuel-economy test, 4 mpg below its EPA highway rating. The lighter X1 and GLA hit 29 mpg and 34 mpg in the same test. Beyond that surface-level appeal, the Evoque falls short on functionality. That attractive touchscreen’s menus can be convoluted, a north-up map orientation can’t be locked in, and it lacks key features such as voice control for the navigation system. Also, the Evoque’s chopped-roof look unsurprisingly robs cargo space and rear-seat room. Like many luxury vehicles, this is a car you buy because of the way it makes you feel and the way others look at you when you’re driving it. The sacrifices that the Evoque requires, both monetarily and in terms of practicality, will be worth it for some—just as with most style statements. Keywords: 2017 land rover range rover evoque autobiography, 2017 land rover range rover evoque convertible, 2017 land rover range rover evoque se premium, 2017 range rover evoque, 2017 range rover evoque autobiography, 2017 range rover evoque autobiography review, 2017 range rover evoque black, 2017 range rover evoq
What to Know About 2017 Honda Civic Hatchback 1.5T Manual Honda has been one of the few automakers using the word as if it means something. Sport trimmings for the hatch include bigger wheels (18 inchers versus standard 16s and optional 17s elsewhere in the range) but also a healthy dollop of unnecessarily blacked-out body parts, which are particularly unflattering with bright paint colors like the red of the car tested here. We prefer the Sport in darker hues, where the black accents seem subtler, although it must be said that there’s nothing subtle about the design: Whether or not our editors like the styling, we all agree there’s lots of it. Surely Civic modders will swap the all-season Continental ContiProContacts, size 235/40R-18, for summer rubber in search of a few more hundredths of a g. But be warned, changing the OE tire could have an undesired effect on overall balance and ride; this car isn’t short on grip, so don’t go mucking up something that’s already good. Making just 180 horsepower and 177 lb-ft of torque, increases of six ponies and 10 lb-ft over the standard hatch’s engine (thank you, premium fuel, which Honda recommends for the Sport), the 1.5-liter is by no means a powerhouse. Then again, the class-leading Mazda 3 makes only 184 horses. Compared with a CVT-equipped Sport hatchback, this manual edition hit 60 mph 0.1 second later. The manual Sport does outperform the CVT in many other acceleration measures, however, cracking off a quarter-mile 0.2 second sooner, in 15.2 seconds at 94 mph, and reaching 100 mph 1.5 seconds earlier than the automatic version. But the pleasure derived from shifting the Civic far outweighs the 0.1-second zero-to-60 penalty. Keywords: honda civic hatchback 2017 univision, honda civic hatchback 2017 usa, new honda civic hatchback 2017, yeni honda civic hatchback 2017, 2017 honda civic hatchback 1.5t manual, 2017 honda civic hatchback 1.5t, 2017 honda civic hatchback 1.5t manual, 2017 honda civic hatchback 1.5t sport 6-speed, 2017 honda civic 2 door hatchback, 2017 honda civic 5 door hatchback, 2017 honda civic hatchback, #cars #car #ride #drive #driver #sportscar #vehicle #vehicles #street #road #fr
Off-Road Runner 2018 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk Review Once upon a recent time, Fiat Chrysler’s SRT division slapped a supercharger on a big V-8. The engineers huffed, the marketers puffed, and they blew the garage down with not one, but two production cars packing 707 horsepower and wearing Hellcat badges. Now, for the third time, The 2018 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk will do that, plus top out at a claimed 180 mph. The Mercedes-AMG G65 had its moment. For about a year, the 621-hp G65 was the world’s most powerful production SUV. The bedazzled German brick house still pumps out more torque, but, at 707, the Trackhawk has 86 more horsepower. How about those numbers? Jeep claims a zero-to-60-mph time of 3.5 seconds and a quarter-mile of 11.6 seconds at 116 mph. The top speed is ungoverned, regardless of whether buyers stick with the 295/45ZR-20 Pirelli Scorpion Verde All Season tires or opt for the summer P Zeros. The Grand Cherokee’s rugged, Mercedes-derived chassis can handle the extra 213 pounds that differentiates the Trackhawk from other GCs. This SUV skips over the Grand Cherokee SRT’s standard Brembo brakes, instead using two-piece discs with aluminum hats and iron rotors. Six-piston calipers clamp larger 15.7-inch discs up front, while the rears remain 13.8 inches. Hiding behind the Trackhawk’s black-chrome quad exhaust tips are a new muffler, crossover pattern, and resonators that blast Hellcat speed metal at high volume. To that end, a double-vented bulged hood, smoked headlight housings, and four exhaust tips surrounded by a gloss-black valance are the most obvious visual changes from the SRT. A few “Supercharged” badges, Trackhawk logos, and two paint colors round out the exterior. Inside, the 200-mph speedometer is a dead giveaway. The price should hover around $80,000, or nearly a third of the AMG G65’s base price, when Jeep dealers clear a spot in their Wrangler-filled showrooms this fall. Keywords: 2018 jeep grand cherokee trackhawk, 2018 jeep grand cherokee trackhawk 0-60, 2018 jeep grand cherokee trackhawk 707 hp, 2018 jeep grand cherokee trackhawk exhaust, 2018 jeep grand cherokee trackhawk for sale, 2018 j
Forgot to mention @corvette. My favorite supercar. ・・・ You hold the wheel. We'll hold the road. #Corvette #Z06 #Vette