#spothubble 1.116K Posts

It takes light more than 147 years to travel across this image from left to right! Only 7,500 light years away, the Carina Nebula is home to over 14,000 stars! Visit http://chandra.harvard.edu/instagram/ for more! . #nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #spacetelescope #telescope #galaxy #nebula #star #active #spidery #tarantula #bubbles #lightyears #picoftheday #solarsystem #milkyway #universe
Repost from @nasa - A cosmic search for a missing arm… This image shows a dwarf galaxy, located about 30 million light-years away in the constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs). Taken by the Hubble Space Telescope ( @NASAHubble), the picture reveals the single major spiral arm of the galaxy, which gives it an asymmetric appearance. But why is there only one such spiral arm, when spiral galaxies normally have at least two? Observations in the ultraviolet provided the first hint: in ultraviolet light the disk of the galaxy appears four times larger than on the image depicted here. An indication that there are a large number of very young and hot stars forming in the outer regions of the galaxy – only visible in the ultraviolet. At first, astronomers assumed that this high star formation rate was being triggered by the interaction with another, nearby dwarf galaxy. They speculated this galactic neighbor may be the culprit, causing it to lose all but one spiral arm. In 2004 astronomers found proof for this claim. The gas in the outermost regions of the neighboring dwarf galaxy has been strongly affected by the galaxy in this image. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #galaxy #dwarfgalaxy #spiral #arm #astrophysics #solarsystem #universe #stars #formation #picoftheday
#FastRepost from @NASA by @fastrepost_app ••• A cosmic search for a missing arm… This image shows a dwarf galaxy, located about 30 million light-years away in the constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs). Taken by the Hubble Space Telescope ( @NASAHubble), the picture reveals the single major spiral arm of the galaxy, which gives it an asymmetric appearance. But why is there only one such spiral arm, when spiral galaxies normally have at least two? Observations in the ultraviolet provided the first hint: in ultraviolet light the disk of the galaxy appears four times larger than on the image depicted here. An indication that there are a large number of very young and hot stars forming in the outer regions of the galaxy – only visible in the ultraviolet. At first, astronomers assumed that this high star formation rate was being triggered by the interaction with another, nearby dwarf galaxy. They speculated this galactic neighbor may be the culprit, causing it to lose all but one spiral arm. In 2004 astronomers found proof for this claim. The gas in the outermost regions of the neighboring dwarf galaxy has been strongly affected by the galaxy in this image. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #galaxy #dwarfgalaxy #spiral #arm #astrophysics #solarsystem #universe #stars #formation #picoftheday
#Repost @nasa ( @get_repost) ・・・ A cosmic search for a missing arm… This image shows a dwarf galaxy, located about 30 million light-years away in the constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs). Taken by the Hubble Space Telescope ( @NASAHubble), the picture reveals the single major spiral arm of the galaxy, which gives it an asymmetric appearance. But why is there only one such spiral arm, when spiral galaxies normally have at least two? Observations in the ultraviolet provided the first hint: in ultraviolet light the disk of the galaxy appears four times larger than on the image depicted here. An indication that there are a large number of very young and hot stars forming in the outer regions of the galaxy – only visible in the ultraviolet. At first, astronomers assumed that this high star formation rate was being triggered by the interaction with another, nearby dwarf galaxy. They speculated this galactic neighbor may be the culprit, causing it to lose all but one spiral arm. In 2004 astronomers found proof for this claim. The gas in the outermost regions of the neighboring dwarf galaxy has been strongly affected by the galaxy in this image. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #galaxy #dwarfgalaxy #spiral #arm #astrophysics #solarsystem #universe #stars #formation #picoftheday
1.6 billion light years from Earth: A faded electron cloud is re-energized after two galaxy clusters, each containing hundreds to thousands of galaxies, crash into one another! This event is referred to as a "Radio Phoenix" — find out why: http://chandra.harvard.edu/instagram/ #nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #spacetelescope #telescope #galaxy #nebula #star #active #spidery #tarantula #bubbles #lightyears #picoftheday #solarsystem #milkyway #universe
#Repost @nasa with @repostapp ・・・ A cosmic search for a missing arm… This image shows a dwarf galaxy, located about 30 million light-years away in the constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs). Taken by the Hubble Space Telescope ( @NASAHubble), the picture reveals the single major spiral arm of the galaxy, which gives it an asymmetric appearance. But why is there only one such spiral arm, when spiral galaxies normally have at least two? Observations in the ultraviolet provided the first hint: in ultraviolet light the disk of the galaxy appears four times larger than on the image depicted here. An indication that there are a large number of very young and hot stars forming in the outer regions of the galaxy – only visible in the ultraviolet. At first, astronomers assumed that this high star formation rate was being triggered by the interaction with another, nearby dwarf galaxy. They speculated this galactic neighbor may be the culprit, causing it to lose all but one spiral arm. In 2004 astronomers found proof for this claim. The gas in the outermost regions of the neighboring dwarf galaxy has been strongly affected by the galaxy in this image. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #galaxy #dwarfgalaxy #spiral #arm #astrophysics #solarsystem #universe #stars #formation #picoftheday
#Repost @nasa ( @get_repost) ・・・ A cosmic search for a missing arm… This image shows a dwarf galaxy, located about 30 million light-years away in the constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs). Taken by the Hubble Space Telescope ( @NASAHubble), the picture reveals the single major spiral arm of the galaxy, which gives it an asymmetric appearance. But why is there only one such spiral arm, when spiral galaxies normally have at least two? Observations in the ultraviolet provided the first hint: in ultraviolet light the disk of the galaxy appears four times larger than on the image depicted here. An indication that there are a large number of very young and hot stars forming in the outer regions of the galaxy – only visible in the ultraviolet. At first, astronomers assumed that this high star formation rate was being triggered by the interaction with another, nearby dwarf galaxy. They speculated this galactic neighbor may be the culprit, causing it to lose all but one spiral arm. In 2004 astronomers found proof for this claim. The gas in the outermost regions of the neighboring dwarf galaxy has been strongly affected by the galaxy in this image. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #galaxy #dwarfgalaxy #spiral #arm #astrophysics #solarsystem #universe #stars #formation #picoftheday
나의 사랑 nasa 인스타그램💐 반짝이는 것을 올려주니 좋다. ㅎ_ㅎ 단순!! #Repost @nasa ( @get_repost) ・・・ Stacked “bubbles” of the so-called Honeycomb Nebula are seen here among spindly, spidery filaments of gas in the Tarantula Nebula. These bubble-like shapes are likely only seen because of the Hubble Space Telescope’s ( @nasahubble) unique viewpoint. At a distance of 160,000 light-years, the Large Magellanic Cloud – which is home to these “bubbles” – is one of the Milky Way’s closest companions. It is also home to one of the largest and most intense regions of active star formation known to exist anywhere in our galactic neighborhood – the Tarantula Nebula. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgements: Judy Schmidt #nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #spacetelescope #telescope #galaxy #nebula #star #active #spidery #tarantula #bubbles #lightyears #picoftheday #solarsystem #milkyway #universe
. جستجویی کیهانی برای یک بازوی گم شده....عکسی از کهکشانی کوتوله به فاصله ۳۰ میلیون سال نوری و در صورت فلکی (سگ های شکارچی ) واقع شده. تصویر توسط تلسکوپ فضایی هابل ( @nasahubble) گرفته شده. تصویر فقط بازوی بزرگ کهکشان ,که ظاهری نامتقارن داره رو نشون میده . آیااین کهکشان فقط از یک بازو تشکیل شده؟ در حالی که معمولا کهکشانهای مارپیچی حداقل دو تا دارند! با مشاهده کهکشان در نور فرابنفش اولین سرنخ ها بدست ما رسید: در نور فرابنفش اندازه دیسک کهکشان چهار برابر تصویر کنونی است. بر اساس اطلاعات بدست آمده از این کهکشان تعداد بسیار زیادی ستاره جوان در نواحی بیرونی کهکشان در حال تشکیل هستند و فقط در نور فرابنفش قابل مشاهده است. در ابتدا ستاره شناسان فرض کردند که این ساختار عظیم ستاره سازی بوسیله کهکشان کوتوله همسایه تحت تاثیر قرار میگیرد.آنها حدس زدند که این همسایه کهکشانی شاید مقصر از دست رفتن بازوی کهکشانی باشه که در تصویر مشاهده میکنید و در نهایت سال ۲۰۰۴ مدرکی برای اثبات ادعای خود پیدا کردند بدین شرح: گاز موجود در بیرونی ترین ناحیه کهکشان کوتوله مجاور بشدت تحت تأثیر کهکشانی واقع شده بود که در تصویر مشاهده میکنید. #translator : @astronomer2b @nasa Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #galaxy #dwarfgalaxy #spiral #arm #astrophysics #solarsystem #universe #stars #formation #picoftheday #future_astronomer #astronomer2b
#Repost @instagram ( @get_repost) ・・・ Featured photo by @alexandr_ivanec Weekend Hashtag Project: #WHPpretend On Tuesday, ghouls and goblins in the US and other parts of the world will celebrate Halloween. To get in the creative spirit of the holiday, the goal this weekend is to let your imagination loose and see people, places and things transform before your eyes — as in this featured photo from Alexander Ivanec ( @alexandr_ivanec). Here are some tips to get you started: If you could be anyone or anything for a day, who or what would you be? Dress up as your idol or inspiration and show us your best looks. Nature likes to play dress up, too. Train your eye to see a spooky tree turn into an emoji, or a landscape that takes on a new shape when seen above from a drone. PROJECT RULES: Please add the #WHPpretend hashtag only to photos and videos taken over this weekend and only submit your own visuals to the project. If you include music in your video submissions, please only use music to which you own the rights. Any tagged photo or video taken over the weekend is eligible to be featured next week. . . . #nasa #space #hubble #hubblespacetelescope #spacetelescope #telescope #galaxy #galactic #spothubble #universe #microwaves #phdtee #ice #astronaut #earth #amazing #spaceman #moon #research #tshirt #design #inspo #inspiration #rocketscientist #rocket #gorgeous #color #inspirational
Regranned from nasa - A cosmic search for a missing arm… This image shows a dwarf galaxy, located about 30 million light-years away in the constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs). Taken by the Hubble Space Telescope (NASAHubble), the picture reveals the single major spiral arm of the galaxy, which gives it an asymmetric appearance. But why is there only one such spiral arm, when spiral galaxies normally have at least two? Observations in the ultraviolet provided the first hint: in ultraviolet light the disk of the galaxy appears four times larger than on the image depicted here. An indication that there are a large number of very young and hot stars forming in the outer regions of the galaxy – only visible in the ultraviolet. At first, astronomers assumed that this high star formation rate was being triggered by the interaction with another, nearby dwarf galaxy. They speculated this galactic neighbor may be the culprit, causing it to lose all but one spiral arm. In 2004 astronomers found proof for this claim. The gas in the outermost regions of the neighboring dwarf galaxy has been strongly affected by the galaxy in this image. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #galaxy #dwarfgalaxy #spiral #arm #astrophysics #solarsystem #universe #stars #formation #picoftheday - #regrann
@Regranned from @nasa - A cosmic search for a missing arm… This image shows a dwarf galaxy, located about 30 million light-years away in the constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs). Taken by the Hubble Space Telescope ( @NASAHubble), the picture reveals the single major spiral arm of the galaxy, which gives it an asymmetric appearance. But why is there only one such spiral arm, when spiral galaxies normally have at least two? Observations in the ultraviolet provided the first hint: in ultraviolet light the disk of the galaxy appears four times larger than on the image depicted here. An indication that there are a large number of very young and hot stars forming in the outer regions of the galaxy – only visible in the ultraviolet. At first, astronomers assumed that this high star formation rate was being triggered by the interaction with another, nearby dwarf galaxy. They speculated this galactic neighbor may be the culprit, causing it to lose all but one spiral arm. In 2004 astronomers found proof for this claim. The gas in the outermost regions of the neighboring dwarf galaxy has been strongly affected by the galaxy in this image. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #galaxy #dwarfgalaxy #spiral #arm #astrophysics #solarsystem #universe #stars #formation #picoftheday - #regrann
@Regrann de @nasa: A cosmic search for a missing arm… This image shows a dwarf galaxy, located about 30 million light-years away in the constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs). Taken by the Hubble Space Telescope ( @NASAHubble), the picture reveals the single major spiral arm of the galaxy, which gives it an asymmetric appearance. But why is there only one such spiral arm, when spiral galaxies normally have at least two? Observations in the ultraviolet provided the first hint: in ultraviolet light the disk of the galaxy appears four times larger than on the image depicted here. An indication that there are a large number of very young and hot stars forming in the outer regions of the galaxy – only visible in the ultraviolet. At first, astronomers assumed that this high star formation rate was being triggered by the interaction with another, nearby dwarf galaxy. They speculated this galactic neighbor may be the culprit, causing it to lose all but one spiral arm. In 2004 astronomers found proof for this claim. The gas in the outermost regions of the neighboring dwarf galaxy has been strongly affected by the galaxy in this image. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #galaxy #dwarfgalaxy #spiral #arm #astrophysics #solarsystem #universe #stars #formation #picoftheday
@Regrann from @nasa: A cosmic search for a missing arm… This image shows a dwarf galaxy, located about 30 million light-years away in the constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs). Taken by the Hubble Space Telescope ( @NASAHubble), the picture reveals the single major spiral arm of the galaxy, which gives it an asymmetric appearance. But why is there only one such spiral arm, when spiral galaxies normally have at least two? Observations in the ultraviolet provided the first hint: in ultraviolet light the disk of the galaxy appears four times larger than on the image depicted here. An indication that there are a large number of very young and hot stars forming in the outer regions of the galaxy – only visible in the ultraviolet. At first, astronomers assumed that this high star formation rate was being triggered by the interaction with another, nearby dwarf galaxy. They speculated this galactic neighbor may be the culprit, causing it to lose all but one spiral arm. In 2004 astronomers found proof for this claim. The gas in the outermost regions of the neighboring dwarf galaxy has been strongly affected by the galaxy in this image. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #galaxy #dwarfgalaxy #spiral #arm #astrophysics #solarsystem #universe #stars #formation #picoftheday
Cosmic Light messengers riding stars from unknown complexity sectors. Spirits fly free among waves of Cosmic energy for love mission. Silent actions will now ignite biological shift towards the Age of Light* in Earth. ⚛☮☯∆ Respect Love and redefine your cells biophotonic vibrational receptors. OR* #light @Regrann from @nasa - "A cosmic search for a missing arm… This image shows a dwarf galaxy, located about 30 million light-years away in the constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs). Taken by the Hubble Space Telescope ( @NASAHubble), the picture reveals the single major spiral arm of the galaxy, which gives it an asymmetric appearance. But why is there only one such spiral arm, when spiral galaxies normally have at least two? Observations in the ultraviolet provided the first hint: in ultraviolet light the disk of the galaxy appears four times larger than on the image depicted here. An indication that there are a large number of very young and hot stars forming in the outer regions of the galaxy – only visible in the ultraviolet. At first, astronomers assumed that this high star formation rate was being triggered by the interaction with another, nearby dwarf galaxy. They speculated this galactic neighbor may be the culprit, causing it to lose all but one spiral arm. In 2004 astronomers found proof for this claim. The gas in the outermost regions of the neighboring dwarf galaxy has been strongly affected by the galaxy in this image. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA #nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #galaxy #dwarfgalaxy #spiral #arm #astrophysics #solarsystem #universe #stars #formation #picoftheday"