#gammarays 5.747K Posts

On display in the office/studio! An original 1974 Mego 8" figure of THE INCREDIBLE HULK...with a repro box. #hulk #theincrediblehulk #brucebanner #mego #gammarays #marvelcomics #marvel #stanlee #jackkirby #toys #vintagetoys #patrickowsley
This brought a good chuckle. #hulk #yoda #father #marvel #starwars #theforce #green #gammarays the force is strong. #beauty
And we are off to a great Sunday! The Incredible Hulk & breakfast in bed. #davidbanner #kimcatrall #thehulk #theincredablehulk #gammarays #billbixby #louferrigno #sunday #breakfastinbed
Thank you to everyone who made my thesis production a success and thank you to these 4 beautiful ladies. Scenic: Edward T. Morris @drawdeedward Lighting: Masha Tsimring @mashald27 Costumes: Kristin Isola Sound: Janie Bullard @bullardjanie Composition: Nick Stefanic @nstefanic #mfa #directorslife #gammarays #marigolds @performingartscollege #newschool #drama
Round and round they go - then BOOM! This animation begins with the final moments of two neutron stars (the super-dense cores of exploded massive stars), whirling around each other in a galaxy 130 million light-years away. Gravitational waves (rippling disturbance in space-time, shown here as pale arcs) bleed away orbital energy, causing the stars to move closer together and merge. As the stars collide, this explosive event emits light across a series of different wavelengths - first gamma rays (magenta), then ultraviolet (violet), then visible and infrared (blue-white to red) and once the jet directed toward us expanded into our view from Earth, X-rays (blue). Our Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope witnessed this event on August 17, 2017 and we watched it unfold over multiple days with a variety of other telescopes, including the Swift spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope ( @NASAHubble), the Spitzer Space Telescope, our Chandra X-Ray Observatory ( @NASAChandraXray) and our NuSTAR mission. The detectors at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) received a gravitational wave signal just 1.7 seconds before the first light was seen by Fermi, making this the first event observed in both light and gravitational waves. • • ( #Repost @nasa ) • Credit: @NASAGoddard/CI Lab #space #nasa #universe #galaxy #stars #astrophysics #astronomy #science #gammarays #ultraviolet #infrared #xrays #gravitationalwaves #neutronstars #hubble #chandra #spitzer #nustar #fermi #swift
Having fun with #radiation in the #morning .... Mmmmh #gammarod #gammarays #cs137 .... #toofoolforschool
It's #NationalTakeAHikeDay! Get outside with our GAMMA RAY TITANLITE Polarized UV400 Aviator Sunglasses and hike to your heart's content! 😎🌳😎🌳
Yassssss!!!!!!.....”I wanna let you know, I’m not just for show!!!!” sing it Jane! #GammaRays #SchoolDaze #Classic #GPhiG
Julian “Dean Big Brother Almighty” & Jane #GammaPhiGamma #GammaRays #SchoolDaze #GPhiG #IconicCouple #Classic
Repost @nasa Round and round they go - then BOOM! This animation begins with the final moments of two neutron stars (the super-dense cores of exploded massive stars), whirling around each other in a galaxy 130 million light-years away. Gravitational waves (rippling disturbance in space-time, shown here as pale arcs) bleed away orbital energy, causing the stars to move closer together and merge. As the stars collide, this explosive event emits light across a series of different wavelengths - first gamma rays (magenta), then ultraviolet (violet), then visible and infrared (blue-white to red) and once the jet directed toward us expanded into our view from Earth, X-rays (blue). Our Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope witnessed this event on August 17, 2017 and we watched it unfold over multiple days with a variety of other telescopes, including the Swift spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope ( @NASAHubble), the Spitzer Space Telescope, our Chandra X-Ray Observatory ( @NASAChandraXray) and our NuSTAR mission. The detectors at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) received a gravitational wave signal just 1.7 seconds before the first light was seen by Fermi, making this the first event observed in both light and gravitational waves. Credit: @NASAGoddard/CI Lab #space #nasa #universe #galaxy #stars #astrophysics #astronomy #science #gammarays #ultraviolet #infrared #xrays #gravitationalwaves #neutronstars #hubble #chandra #spitzer #nustar #fermi
Dressing room shenanigans #gammarays @7">#tonight @7 #mfa #backstage
Красоты и тайны Космоса, которые встречаются и в нашей жизни😘🤗 #Rensta #Repost: @nasa via @renstapp ··· “ Round and round they go - then BOOM! This animation begins with the final moments of two neutron stars (the super-dense cores of exploded massive stars), whirling around each other in a galaxy 130 million light-years away. Gravitational waves (rippling disturbance in space-time, shown here as pale arcs) bleed away orbital energy, causing the stars to move closer together and merge. As the stars collide, this explosive event emits light across a series of different wavelengths - first gamma rays (magenta), then ultraviolet (violet), then visible and infrared (blue-white to red) and once the jet directed toward us expanded into our view from Earth, X-rays (blue). Our Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope witnessed this event on August 17, 2017 and we watched it unfold over multiple days with a variety of other telescopes, including the Swift spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope ( @NASAHubble), the Spitzer Space Telescope, our Chandra X-Ray Observatory ( @NASAChandraXray) and our NuSTAR mission. The detectors at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) received a gravitational wave signal just 1.7 seconds before the first light was seen by Fermi, making this the first event observed in both light and gravitational waves. Credit: @NASAGoddard/CI Lab #space #nasa #universe #galaxy #stars #astrophysics #astronomy #science #gammarays #ultraviolet #infrared #xrays #gravitationalwaves #neutronstars #hubble #chandra #spitzer #nustar #fermi #swift
#Repost @nasa ・・・ Round and round they go - then BOOM! This animation begins with the final moments of two neutron stars (the super-dense cores of exploded massive stars), whirling around each other in a galaxy 130 million light-years away. Gravitational waves (rippling disturbance in space-time, shown here as pale arcs) bleed away orbital energy, causing the stars to move closer together and merge. As the stars collide, this explosive event emits light across a series of different wavelengths - first gamma rays (magenta), then ultraviolet (violet), then visible and infrared (blue-white to red) and once the jet directed toward us expanded into our view from Earth, X-rays (blue). Our Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope witnessed this event on August 17, 2017 and we watched it unfold over multiple days with a variety of other telescopes, including the Swift spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope ( @NASAHubble), the Spitzer Space Telescope, our Chandra X-Ray Observatory ( @NASAChandraXray) and our NuSTAR mission. The detectors at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) received a gravitational wave signal just 1.7 seconds before the first light was seen by Fermi, making this the first event observed in both light and gravitational waves. Credit: @NASAGoddard/CI Lab #space #nasa #universe #galaxy #stars #astrophysics #astronomy #science #gammarays #ultraviolet #infrared #xrays #gravitationalwaves #neutronstars #hubble #chandra #spitzer #nustar #fermi #swift
It's official now! Got my first film badge with my name on it! #xrayman #safetyfirst #ppe #gammarays #radiation #pipelife