#Jadassohn 6 Posts

Salomon Jadassohn (13 August 1831 – 1 February 1902) was a #German #pianist, #composer and a renowned teacher of piano and composition at the Leipzig Conservatory. #Jadassohn composed more than 140 works in virtually every genre, including four symphonies, four Serenades for Orchestra and one for Flute and String Orchestra, two piano concertos, lieder, sonatas, opera and a considerable amount of chamber music, including a string quartet, four piano trios, three piano quartets, three piano quintets and a serenade for flute and string quintet. These chamber works rank among his finest compositions. Considered a master of counterpoint and harmony, he was also a gifted melodist, following in the tradition of Mendelssohn. His works also show the influence of #Wagner and #Liszt, whose music deeply impressed him. In addition, he wrote several important books on composition and music theory. #music #musicfact #musicfacts #classicalmusic #classicalmusician #wemoveclassicalmusic
Salomon Jadassohn - Piano Concerto No.1 Op.89 & No.2 Op.90 🎶💿 Romantic romantic romantic!! #markusbecker #rundfunksinfonieorchesterberlin #michaelsanderling #jadassohn #pianoconcerto #classicalmusic
A day like today a musician was born ... #Salomon #Jadassohn (13 August 1831 – 1 February 1902 ) was a German #pianist, #composer and a renowned teacher of #piano and #composition at the Leipzig Conservatory. Jadassohn was born to a Jewish family living in Breslau, the capital of the Prussian province of Silesia. This was a generation after the emancipation of the Jews in Central European German-speaking lands and during a time of relative tolerance. First educated locally, Jadassohn enrolled at the Leipzig Conservatory in 1848, just a few years after it had been founded by Felix #Mendelssohn. There he studied #composition with Moritz #Hauptmann, Ernst #Richter and Julius #Rietz, as well as #piano with Ignaz #Moscheles. At the same time, he studied privately with Franz #Liszt in Weimar. On 13 April 1851 in Weimar he was the soloist at the first #performance, under Liszt's baton, of Liszt's arrangement for piano and #orchestra of Carl Maria von #Weber's Polonaise (Polacca) brillante "L'hilarité" in E major, Op. 72.
On may 22 a musician was born ... #Émile #Sauret (22 May 1852 – 12 February 1920) was a French #violinist and #composer. Sauret wrote over 100 #violin pieces, including a famous cadenza for the first movement of Niccolò #Paganini's First Violin #Concerto, and the "Gradus ad Parnassum". Sauret was born in Dun-le-Roi, France in 1852. He began studying violin at the Conservatoire de Strasbourg at the age of six, and with a reputation as child prodigy he began #performing two years later. He studied under Charles Auguste de #Bériot and later became a student of Henri #Vieuxtemps and Henryk #Wieniawski.Aged 18, he started studying #composition as a pupil of Salomon #Jadassohn at the Leipzig Conservatory, where he struck up many friendships. Among these were Fritz Steinbach and Richard Sahla, a child prodigy like Sauret himself. Sauret played in the most famous concert halls of his time. He made his American debut in 1872. Franz #Liszt #performed #sonatas with him.In 1873, Sauret married Teresa #Carreño, a Venezuelan #pianist and #composer, by whom he had a daughter, Emilita. The marriage did not last; in 1879 he remarried.
On may 18 a musician was born ... #Bernard #Zweers (born #Bernardus #Josephus #Wilhelmus #Zweers) (, 18 May 1854 - Amsterdam, 9 December 1924) was a Dutch #composer and #music teacher. Bernard Zweers was born in 1854 as the son of an Amsterdam book- and #music shopkeeper. Although his father was an amateur #singer, he strongly disapproved of his son’s #musical interests, expecting him to follow him in the family business. Being fundamentally self-taught, he had some minor musical successes before his parents finally approved and sent him to study with Salomon #Jadassohn in Leipzig in 1881-1883. Of crucial importance to Zweers' musical education was his first exposure to the work of Richard #Wagner when he was present at the Berlin premiere of the Ring des Nibelungen, in 1881: "I, who never ventured farther than Nijmegen and who had never heard even a normal #opera before, I was in Berlin, listening to #Wagner's Ring! ... and I returned a full-blooded Wagnerian."